Thursday, April 10, 2008

Things We Learn From Owning a Horse: To Tickle Your Funny Bone

Having been owned by a few horses during my lifetime, when I ran across this little ditty, I nearly fell off my chair laughing. These words of wisdom are absolutely true. I hope they will delight you as much as they did me.

RavenEaster

Kim and Raven enjoy a fun moment of bonding.

1. People who don't take care of their own horses will be the first ones to tell you how to care for yours.

2. You should never buy a cheap girth!

3. A handsome horse who's badly behaved will become a lot less attractive in about 15 minutes.

4. People who think they have nothing more to learn about riding, hit the ground the hardest.

5. Children and ponies are natural allies and often have identical dispositions.

6. The richest horse people most often look the poorest.

7. The closeness of a horse is one of the sweetest smells in the world.

8. A solitary ride through the woods is more beneficial then six months with the best psychiatrist.

9. The worse a person rides the more likely they are going to blame it on the horse.

10. The best thing about going to the barn first thing in the morning is that horses don't care how you look.

11. If a dealer insists a horse is worth twice what he's asking he's usually worth half that much.

12. The best way to appreciate how another person rides is to get on their horse, but it can be a quick way to get hurt.

13. It is not wise to argue with something that outweighs you buy 1,000 pounds

14. I'd rather have a horse with a perfect mind then a perfect head.

15. If you think you have left the water on in the barn you have, if you think you have closed the pasture gate, you haven't.

16. When someone asks you if you like their horse always say 'yes'.

17. The happiest people I know own horses, dogs, cats and at least one deranged goat.

18. If you're looking for the perfect horse you will never own one.

19. Owning a horse can either make a marriage or break it.

20. If someone says that horse has a little buck, it has a BIG buck.

21. If we need rain, schedule a show.

22. A clean stables and a sparkling horse are among life's great pleasures.

23. Even free horses can be too expensive. Especially, free horses.

24. A more expensive horse doesn't make a better one.

25. I will never ever have an empty stable and I have accepted that fact.

26. Losing a horse can break your heart, but it will have been worth it.

If you can't imagine life without a horse... DON'T

6 comments:

Vicki said...

I think out of the 26 rules for having horses, about 23 of them apply to me. This is just hysterical, but so true. But they do bring a lot of joy into my life, and I love them dearly.

Anonymous said...

Horses were a dream of mine since a child. I was blessed with my first horse when I was 11 and her only 2. We learned life together, which I feel is the only way. I look at videos and cry at the oneness we had. She 'outgrew her spacesuit' (as a friend lovingly put it) and had to be put down at 31. All of those lakes we swam together , bareback 1/4 mile races at the 3 day rodeo, rodeo, riding with the Durango Gunslingers, horse shows, parades. Every day was an adventure! I cry for the horses who won't be blessed with having a human. But most of all I feel for a human who wasn't allowed to love and have the respect of such a majestic being! Thanks Jo! The rules are funny. Especially the one about 1000 pounds. 'SAVE THE AMERICAN COWBOY...YOU BETTER DO IT NOW BOY!' michael martin murphy.. I am Kim. Please think before you breed! If this is NOT a lifetime commentment this horses future could end up a very sad one. Also, call it spoliling perhaps? But it is so much easier to love these beings through life then to beat them into someting they don't understand. Horses are unconditional love. Horses also aren't something many 'get' these days. So please share your horses and the love for them with others. Especially the children!
HAVE YOU HUGGED YOUR HORSE TODAY?

Janet Roper said...

This is such a terrific posting and so true! I loved reading it.

I went to see my horse Shiloh today directly after I'd performed a gig (I fiddle around when I'm not horsing around). I was dressed for a performance, complete with makeup and decent shoes. Here in MN it was raining, snowing, sleeting and very windy. I arrived at the barn, ran in, gave Shiloh his feed and meds and ran back through the icky weather and mud to the sanctuary of my car.

I did not hug my horse today. It was not a perfect day.

Harmony to all,
Janet Roper

Cheryl said...

That was so adorable and so Very true!!! Horses are so extremely loving, friendly creatures -- most of them anyway! :>)

I just Love reading your posts/articles!!!

Jo said...

Janet,

I had to laugh out loud when you left your comment about going to the barn all dressed up.

Right before I left to attend my graduation ceremony from social work school I had to visit my horse, Patti. I was dressed to kill of course, as we all were going to go out to celebrate this monumental event. Grinning here!

Arriving at the barn, I went to her stall and opened the door. She gazed at me in bewilderment. It was if she hardly recognized me. She turned her back to me as if I was a complete stranger. Very odd behavior for her. She always came up to give me a snuggle.

I think it was my perfume more than anything that put her off. But I went in to the stall, and put my arms around her anyway.

So I smelled horsey.. LOL. I could care less.

My master's thesis was written about riding for the handicapped, so I considered myself fully dressed for the occassion.

Horses are remarkable, aren't they?

Janet Roper said...

Horses are funny and discriminating, aren't they? :-)

One time I was on my way to a gig at a memory care facility and stopped by the barn to visit Shiloh, as it was on the way. I was wearing a long skirt, which was decorated with a netting at the hem. I arrived at the gig and everything went well until one of the women commented on the lovely decoration on my my skirt. I looked down and straw was caught in the netting!

Harmony,
Janet